Bukid Sylvatica

By | Por: Scott Elliott

<ESPAÑOL ABAJO>

“Bukid” is “Farm” in Filipino. Sylvatica and the love for forests have come to The Philippines and taken me with it. The Philippines shares so many similarities and parallels with Costa Rica and Jamaica, but it also has so much that is unique about it. The climate is basically the same as Costa Rica and Jamaica. Many of the same agroforestry staples grow in all three of these countries, such as bananas, plantains, pineapples, okra, sweet potato, pumpkin, avocado, mammey sapote, coconut, guava, cashew, jackfruit, mango, cocoa, star apple, noni, madre de cacao, and water apple. It has been so interesting and such a blessing to have the opportunity to spend most of my recent life in these three countries. With so many similarities in climatic and vegetative qualities, I have become increasingly perceptive to cultural and ethnic qualities that make each of these places so unique.

Costa Rica, which is the origin of Finca Sylvatica, is a place that thousands of permaculturists call home. It has the ecological awareness and regulations in place to keep the environment relatively protected, resilient, and adaptive to climate change. For decades it has been extensively exposed to the tourism industry, and in particular, the ecotourism industry. As a result, much of the population in Costa Rica has become very international.

In Jamaica, the population is almost completely composed of descended West African slaves. Much of them are now subsistence farmers that rely on a limited selection of exotic agricultural products that have been naturalized and distributed domestically (Swabey, 1939, 1942, McDonald et al, 2003; Headley and Thompson, 1986). There is only one active permaculture center on the island that I know of, called The Source Farm, which holds only one or two Permaculture Design Courses per year. Thanks to many of you, I officially won the 2019 Peace Corps Jamaica Cover Photo Contest, which means that it will be featured as Peace Corps Jamaica’s official Facebook cover photo.

photocontest

The Philippines has by far the lowest gross national income of the three (General Assembly Resolution, 2016), yet in my experience has by far the richest and most generous and friendly culture of them all. I must admit that I am biased since I am half-Filipino. Like Jamaica, Permaculture is not well known yet, but the principals are already in practice. The Philippines is also located very close to Australia, where there is an abundance of permaculture courses.

cropped-climate-zones-map-revised-032814-21

Currently, all three of these places feel like home to me. Even though they are all so far apart, they all share the qualities that happen to be most important for my Peace Corps Masters International research at The School of Environmental and Forest Sciences at The University of Washington (UW). The qualitative half of my research methods, titled “Farmer Perspectives in Jamaica,” have now been approved by the UW’s Human Subjects Division, which means that I can now officially begin conducting at least 36 ethnographic interviews with local Jamaican farmers. In a nutshell, my methods are based in naturalism, immersion, understanding, and discovery. It is a semi-structured, long-term, narrative, literary, non-fiction oral history that relies heavily on participant observation. So far, I have completed 8, all of whom have been very receptive and allowing of audio recording. I can already see that these interactions will be very valuable to my overall research, which is likely to revolve around a technique that I learned about in permaculture, called “chop and drop.” The definition of this technique that I give to Jamaican farmers is: “a sustainable farming and forest management practice in which the branches and leaves of plants are cut and left to decompose directly on the ground.” Usually the definition requires follow-up to describe how contrary it is to “slash and burn,” but in my mind, it goes much further beyond, in that it is a form of pruning that maximizes and improves the economic, social, and environmental impact of ecosystem management. If any of my readers have discovered this technique in the scientific literature, please let me know. The closest thing that I have found to it is the term “coppicing,” which doesn’t seem to capture the element of time to me as well as I would like it to. Regardless, my overall research will look at coppicing over the long term, specifically at my Peace Corps site here in St. Mary, Jamaica. The quantitative side of my research is just getting off the ground as well. So far, it just involves taking measurements of various trees before and after pruning to monitor regrowth. Perhaps down the road, it could expand to observe all the products and services that come from the process.

For many of you, the last paragraph that you read could have been the most boring one you have ever read in your entire life. The lack of audience interest is more common than I anticipated for thesis writing. To congratulate everyone who made it this far, I will let you in on one of the most amazing and mind-blowing secrets I have ever discovered in the agroforestry world, and that is the makapuno. Check out this mini-documentary I made while in The Philippines last month:

The food in The Philippines is so diverse, so delicious, so affordable, and so creative. Check out all of the produce I found in the seafood markets in the two pics below. There were three different kinds of seaweed, a dozen or so different kinds of shellfish, and several dozen different kinds of sundried fish.

shellfishmarket

fishmarket

The permaculture principle “creatively adapt and respond to change” was well utilized by Bridget and me when we realized that the pests damaging these rice paddies we were standing in were even more delicious than the rice itself at the Cabiokid Permaculture Center in The Philippines.

snailhunting

Monkeys in The Philippines are also considered pests. There were about 10-20 of them gathered around a filthy smartphone on the side of the road while we were bird watching. We considered taking the phone for several minutes until abandoning the idea. It was not worth having them attack us, bite us, steal our food, phones, poop in our car, give us rabies, or any of the myriad reasons that people avoid them. I couldn’t help but consider how Bill Mollison said, “the problem is the solution,” and that “you don’t have a slug problem, you have a duck deficiency.” In our case, we didn’t have a monkey problem, we had a Philippine Eagle (also known as ‘monkey-eating eagle’) deficiency.

monkeys

This is a bamboo bicycle frame that was made at the Cabiokid Permaculture Foundation in Nueva Ecija, The Philippines.

bamboobike

At Cabiokid, they soak their fresh cut bamboo in their rice paddies to prevent decay.

bamboocuring

You don’t have a snail problem, you have food abundance.

snailcleaning

This is one of the most efficient and low maintenance vertical gardens that I have seen. It utilizes a small strip of sunlight and roof rainwater to provide resources for a wide variety and abundance of plants. I really admire Ate Inday’s ingenuity in utilizing this niche to create something that is both beautiful as well as productive.

wallgarden

Here is another idea that I discovered here in The Philippines. Repurpose 2-liter plastic bottles for drip irrigation devices. Just cut off the bottom of the bottle and attach it to a bamboo stake. Loosen the cap so that the water comes out in a slow trickle to irrigate plants. It works especially well for recently planted trees, such as the cocoa tree below.

waterbottlecollection

 

waterbottleirrigating

The large vehicle below is one of the many different models of “Jeepneys” that are so commonly found in The Philippines. This one is probably used for transporting agricultural goods. Just like so many things in The Philippines, it is so customized and adapted to the local climate that you will never find another one like it. And just like all my trips to The Philippines, it is so unique and fascinating that I know it will keep drawing me back.

bigjeepney

 

 

 

“Bukid” es “Granja” en filipino. Sylvatica y el amor por los bosques han llegado a Filipinas y me han llevado consigo. Filipinas comparte muchas similitudes y paralelos con Costa Rica y Jamaica, pero también tiene muchas cosas únicas. El clima es basicamente igual a Costa Rica y Jamaica. Muchos de los mismos productos básicos agroforestales crecen en estos tres países, tales como bananos, plátanos, piñas, quingombas, camotes, calabazas, paltas, zapote, coco, guayaba, anacardo, papa dulce, mango, cacao, manzana estrella, noni. , madre de cacao, y agua de manzana. Ha sido muy interesante y una bendición tener la oportunidad de pasar la mayor parte de mi vida reciente en estos tres países. Con tantas similitudes en las cualidades climáticas y vegetativas, me he vuelto cada vez más sensible a las cualidades culturales y étnicas que hacen que cada uno de estos lugares sea tan único.

Costa Rica, que es el origen de Finca Sylvatica, es un lugar que miles de permacultores llaman hogar. Tiene la conciencia ecológica y las normas vigentes para mantener el medio ambiente relativamente protegido, resistente y adaptable al cambio climático. Durante décadas ha estado ampliamente expuesto a la industria del turismo y, en particular, a la industria del ecoturismo. Como resultado, gran parte de la población en Costa Rica se ha vuelto muy internacional.

En Jamaica, la población está compuesta casi por completo de esclavos descendientes de África occidental. Muchos de ellos son ahora agricultores de subsistencia que dependen de una selección limitada de productos agrícolas exóticos que se han naturalizado y distribuido en el país (Swabey, 1939, 1942, McDonald et al, 2003; Headley y Thompson, 1986). Sólo conozco un centro de permacultura activo en la isla, llamado The Source Farm, que tiene solo uno o dos cursos de diseño de permacultura por año. Gracias a muchos de ustedes, gané oficialmente el Concurso de fotos de portada de Peace Corps Jamaica 2019, lo que significa que se presentará como la foto de portada oficial de Facebook de Peace Corps Jamaica.

photocontest

Filipinas tiene, con mucho, el ingreso nacional bruto más bajo de los tres (Resolución de la Asamblea General, 2016), pero según mi experiencia tiene, con mucho, la cultura más rica, generosa y amistosa de todas. Debo admitir que soy parcial, ya que soy medio filipino. Al igual que Jamaica, la permacultura aún no es conocida, pero los principios ya están en práctica. Filipinas también se encuentra muy cerca de Australia, donde hay una gran cantidad de cursos de permacultura.

cropped-climate-zones-map-revised-032814-21

Actualmente, estos tres lugares se sienten como en casa para mí. A pesar de que todos están muy alejados, todos comparten las cualidades que resultan ser más importantes para mi investigación de Maestros del Cuerpo de Paz Internacional en la Escuela de Ciencias Ambientales y Forestales de la Universidad de Washington (UW). La mitad cualitativa de mis métodos de investigación, titulada “Perspectivas de los agricultores en Jamaica”, ahora ha sido aprobada por la División de Sujetos Humanos de la UW, lo que significa que ahora puedo comenzar oficialmente a realizar al menos 36 entrevistas etnográficas con agricultores locales de Jamaica. En pocas palabras, mis métodos se basan en el naturalismo, la inmersión, la comprensión y el descubrimiento. Es una historia oral semiestructurada, narrativa, literaria, de no ficción a largo plazo que se basa en gran medida en la observación participante. Hasta ahora, he completado 8, todos los cuales han sido muy receptivos y han permitido la grabación de audio. Ya puedo ver que estas interacciones serán muy valiosas para mi investigación general, que probablemente girará en torno a una técnica que aprendí sobre permacultura, llamada “picar y soltar”. La definición de esta técnica que doy a los agricultores de Jamaica es : “Una práctica agrícola sostenible y de manejo forestal en la que se cortan las ramas y las hojas de las plantas y se las deja descomponer directamente en el suelo”. Por lo general, la definición requiere un seguimiento para describir lo contrario que es “cortar y quemar”, pero en mi opinión, va mucho más allá, ya que es una forma de poda que maximiza y mejorar el impacto económico, social y ambiental de la gestión de los ecosistemas. Si alguno de mis lectores ha descubierto esta técnica en la literatura científica, hágamelo saber. Lo más cercano que he encontrado es el término “coppicing”, que no parece captar el elemento del tiempo para mí tan bien como me gustaría. En cualquier caso, mi investigación general se centrará en el reparo a largo plazo, específicamente en el sitio de mi Cuerpo de Paz aquí en St. Mary, Jamaica. El lado cuantitativo de mi investigación es simplemente despegar también. Hasta ahora, solo implica realizar mediciones de varios árboles antes y después de la poda para monitorear el rebrote. Quizás a lo largo del camino podría expandirse para observar todos los productos y servicios que provienen del proceso.

Para muchos de ustedes, el último párrafo que leyó podría haber sido el más aburrido que haya leído en toda su vida. La falta de interés de la audiencia es más común de lo que anticipé para la redacción de tesis. Para felicitar a todos los que llegaron hasta aquí, les contaré uno de los secretos más sorprendentes y alucinantes que he descubierto en el mundo agroforestal, y ese es el makapuno. Echa un vistazo a este mini documental que hice mientras estuve en Filipinas el mes pasado:

La comida en Filipinas es muy variada, deliciosa, asequible y creativa. Echa un vistazo a todos los productos que encontré en los mercados de mariscos en las dos fotos a continuación. Había tres tipos diferentes de algas, una docena de diferentes tipos de mariscos, y varias docenas de diferentes tipos de peces secados al sol.

shellfishmarket

fishmarket

El principio de permacultura «adaptarnos y responder al cambio de manera creativa» fue bien utilizado por Bridget y yo cuando nos dimos cuenta de que las plagas que dañaban estos arrozales eran aún más deliciosas que el propio arroz cuando estuvemos en El Centro de Permacultura de Cabiokid en Las Filipinas.

snailhunting

Los monos en las Filipinas también se consideran plagas. Había alrededor de 10 a 20 de ellos reunidos alrededor de un teléfono inteligente y sucio al costado de la carretera mientras estábamos observando aves. Consideramos tomar el teléfono por varios minutos hasta abandonar la idea. No valía la pena que nos atacaran, mordieran, robaran nuestra comida, teléfonos, caca en nuestro coche, nos dieran rabia o cualquiera de las miles de razones por las que las personas los evitan. No pude evitar considerar cómo dijo Bill Mollison, “el problema es la solución” y que “no tienes un problema de babosas, tienes una deficiencia de pato”. En nuestro caso, no teníamos un mono problema, tuvimos una deficiencia de águila filipina (también conocida como ‘águila comedora de monos’).

monkeys

Este es un cuadro de bicicleta de bambú que se hizo en la Fundación de Permacultura de Cabiokid en Nueva Écija, Filipinas.

bamboobike

En Cabiokid, empapan su bambú recién cortado en sus arrozales para evitar la descomposición.

bamboocuring

No tienes un problema con los caracoles, tienes abundancia de comida.

snailcleaning

Este es uno de los jardines verticales más eficientes y de bajo mantenimiento que he visto. Utiliza una pequeña franja de luz solar y agua de lluvia del techo para proporcionar recursos para una amplia variedad y abundancia de plantas. Realmente admiro el ingenio de Ate Inday al utilizar este nicho para crear algo que sea a la vez bello y productivo.

wallgarden

Aquí hay otra idea que descubrí aquí en Filipinas. Reutilizar botellas de plástico de 2 litros para dispositivos de riego por goteo. Simplemente corte la parte inferior de la botella y fíjela a una estaca de bambú. Afloje la tapa para que el agua salga lentamente para regar las plantas. Funciona especialmente bien para árboles plantados recientemente, como el árbol de cacao debajo.

waterbottlecollection

waterbottleirrigating

El gran vehículo de abajo es uno de los muchos modelos diferentes de “Jeepneys” que se encuentran tan comúnmente en Filipinas. Este es probablemente utilizado para el transporte de productos agrícolas. Al igual que muchas otras cosas en Filipinas, está tan personalizado y adaptado al clima local que nunca encontrarás otro igual. Y al igual que todos mis viajes a Filipinas, es tan único y fascinante que sé que me seguirá atrayendo.

bigjeepney

 

 

References

 

Headley, M.V., Thompson, D.A., 1986. Forest Management in Jamaica. In: Thompson, D.A., Bretting, P.K., Humphries, M. (Eds.), Forests of Jamaica. The Jamaica Society of Scientists and Technologists, Kingston, Jamaica, pp. 91-96. 1986.

M.A. McDonald, A. Hofney -Collins, J.R. Healey, T.C.R. Goodland. Evaluation of trees indigenous to the montane forest of the Blue Mountains, Jamaica for reforestation and agroforestry. Forest Ecology and Management. Elsevier. 175 (2003) p. 379-401.

Swabey, C., Forestry in Jamaica. Source: Empire Forestry Journal, Vol. 18, No. 1 (July 1939), pp. 19-29 Published by: Commonwealth Forestry Association. Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/42595019

Swabey, C., 1942. Forest Planting in Jamaica during 1940. Caribbean For. 3, 184.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s